Pitching to lenders – how to get it right, first time

Pitching to lenders – how to get it right, first time


Pitching to lenders – how to get it right, first time

Earlier this year, US research firm, CB Insights surveyed over 100 start-ups to better understand reasons for early failures. The most obvious – no clear market need, not having the right team, and running out of cash – featured prominently. However, poor marketing was also a top contender as a reason for failure. This doesn’t only relate to difficulty in raising awareness of the product or service, but speaks to an inability to position the company in the eyes of potential lenders and investors.

Gary Palmer, CEO of Paragon Lending Solutions, discusses what entrepreneurs should be aware of when preparing to pitch.

Avoid fantasy financials

While various institutions have different mandates and place emphasis on different types of growth, all of them need to see evidence of your potential. When creating your financial projections make sure you can back up the assumptions behind the numbers. Developing financial projections is an art. Companies should certainly avoid overinflating future earnings, but they should also be wary of being too conservative. Reasonable, defendable assumptions that you are confident can be achieved, is the goal. These are also important as they will set the parameters for measurement going forward and need to be realistic if you are going to live up to them.


Avoid information overload

Pitching to lenders is a process and the leadership team should have a specific, shorter pitch for the first meeting. The top level detail should be included with an emphasis on ensuring the lender understands what it is you do, which market problem you are solving, the future potential of your company and how you aim to achieve success. I have been in pitches where the presentation looks fantastic, but runs into 30 or more slides. Once you have piqued their genuine interest, you can delve into the finer detail. Death by PowerPoint never closes deals.

Know your audience  

Each lender will be looking for specifics according to their mandate. A bank may be interested only in the numbers and the underlying security of the deal. Certain asset managers, meanwhile, may be looking for local job creation, while others will pay close attention to your ESG (Environmental, Social and Governance) report if sustainability is high on their agenda. You should understand the motivators for each lender and remember that this is not a one-size-fits all exercise.

Tell a story

Humans are hardwired to respond to storytelling. From our days sitting around fires in caves we have used stories as mechanisms to teach and retain information. Entrepreneurs should weave their company’s past and future into an interesting story to grab attention. Using different mediums, like a company video, can make a significant difference. Three minutes of screen time with compelling visuals will help get the message across as well as give a flavour of the business that a written document can never achieve.

Keep it clean

Once lenders are interested they will be doing more than kicking tyres. They will be doing a thorough search under the bonnet and your financials should hold no hidden surprises. Up to date management accounts and audited financials are imperative While we all know how difficult it is to run a start-up, having personal loans run through the business accounts will not do.

You don’t have to go it alone

Pitching to lenders is a skill, and not everyone is a born salesperson. You only have a few minutes to catch an investor’s eye. It makes sense to work with a partner who knows the lending environment and all its players. Insight and experience is the secret sauce when it comes to securing lending. Find an independent lending specialist at the beginning of the fund raising exercise who can help you craft your pitch and, most importantly, help you negotiate the best possible deal.

Read more at www.paragonlending.co.za or follow @Gary_Paragon on Twitter or Paragon Lending Solutions on LinkedIn.